Highlighting and contouring guide for your face shape! It really makes a difference! This chart is so genius!

Highlight and Contour according to Face Shape

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Find Your Best Color

Have you ever tried on a blouse or a shade of lipstick that makes your skin, eyes, and face come alive, only to try another one that’s almost exactly the same shade but makes you look tired, washed-out, and just generally off? The first one probably matched your skin’s surface tone and undertone perfectly, while the second shade may have a totally wrong undertone.

What’s that? You kinda understand, but don’t really know the difference between surface tone and undertone? Join the club. When it comes to fashion and beauty, there are few buzzwords as prevalent as “cool undertones” and “warm undertones” In fact, we’re always hearing that identifying which category we fall into is integral to our overall attractiveness, but finding out where we fall is still shrouded in confusion.

The first step in grasping the concept? Understanding that our skin’s surface tone is the color you’d describe yourself as having (ivory, light, medium, tan, dark, etc.) Your skin’s undertone is the color underneath the surface. You can have the same skin color as someone, but a different undertone, which are broken down like this:

Cool (pink, red or bluish undertones)
Warm (yellow, peachy, golden undertones)
Neutral (a mix of warm and cool undertones)

One big misconcpeton: That pale girls can’t be warm-toned. In fact, many fair-skinned women have warm undertones (Nicole Kidman is one of them!) and dark-skinned women have cool tones (supermodel Alek Wek is a cool tone.)

So, how can you determine which category you fall into? Read on!

1. Check Your Veins
Push your sleeves up right now and look at the veins on the inside of your wrist. Are they blue or green? If they look more blue, you likely have cool undertones. If the veins look greenish, you’re warm. It’s worth noting, warm girls, that you’re veins aren’t actually green—they look it because you’re seeing them through yellow-toned skin (yellow + blue = green.)

2. The Good Old Jewelry Trick.
Think about whether you look better in silver or gold jewelry (Not which you like more, but which actually makes you look more radiant, glowing, and awake.) Typically, girls with cool undertones look better in silver and platinum metals, and warm-toned women look better in gold.

3. The Neutral Test.
Think about what neutral shades flatter you best. Does your skin, eyes, and face look better in bright white and black hues, or ivory, off-whites, and brown/tan shades? The former means you’re probably cool-toned, and the latter, warm.

4. Eye and Hair Color.
Your natural eye and hair colors can help figure out your coloring. Customarily, cool people have eyes that are blue, gray, or green and have blond, brown, or black hair with blue, silver, violet and ash undertones. Conversely, warm-toned women usually have brown, amber, or hazel eyes with strawberry blond, red, brown, or black hair. Their hair tends to have gold, red, orange, or yellow undertones.

5. The Sun’s Effects.
When you’re out in the sun, does your skin turn a golden-brown, or does it burn and turn pink first? If you fit into the former category, you’re warm-toned, while cool tones tend to burn (fair-skinned cool girls will simply burn, while medium-skinned cool-toned girls will burn then tan.)

6. Identify with a Celeb.
A few celebs who have cool undertones: January Jones, Scarlett Johansson, Anne Hathaway, Lucy Liu, Cameron Diaz, Cara Delevingne.
A celebs who have warm undertones: Jennifer Lopez, Nicole Kidman, Jessica Alba, Rachel Bilson, Jennifer Aniston, Beyoncé.

7. Find Which Colors Look Best on You
There’s no denying that certain colors will make you look better regardless of your skin’s undertone. Warm-toned girls should lean toward yellows, oranges, browns, yellow-greens, ivory’s, and warm reds, while cool-toned girls should wear blues, greens, pinks, purples, blue-greens, magentas, and true “blue-based” reds.

Coconut Oil Lotion Bar

There are so many health benefits to using coconut oil, like how it reduces skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. It also softens the skin and relieves dryness and flaking. Applied topically it helps to prevent wrinkles,saggy skin and age spots. Coconut Oil is truly amazing!

Today I’m sharing a recipe for making Coconut Oil Lotion Bars. These bars are great for everyone, especially those who live in warmer areas and don’t want their moisturizer to melt! This lotion bar is easy to make and only has 3 ingredients!

Coconut Oil Lotion Bar
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Coconut Oil Lotion Bar

The other day I posted a tutorial on how to make whipped Coconut Oil Moisturizer. I mentioned a few of the many health benefits of using coconut oil, like how it reduce skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. It also softens the skin and relieves dryness and flaking. Applied topically it helps to prevent wrinkles,saggy skin and age spots. Coconut Oil is truly amazing!

Today I’m sharing a recipe for making Coconut Oil Lotion Bars. These bars are great for everyone, especially those who live in warmer areas and don’t want their moisturizer to melt! This lotion bar is easy to make and only has 3 ingredients!

Coconut Oil Lotion Bar:

Equipment:
Saucepan
Lotion Mold, Muffin Pan or Tins

Ingredients:
1 Part Coconut Oil – where to find quality coconut oil
1 Part Pure Beeswax
Essential Oils (Optional)

Directions:
Heat coconut oil and beeswax together in a saucepan over low heat. It helps if you break up the beeswax into small chunks because it takes a while for the wax to melt. Once the beeswax and coconut oil are melted add essential oils. I like to use vanilla and lavender. I’m sensitive to strong fragrances so I only add a few drops.

Pour melted coconut oil and beeswax into lotion bar molds or muffin tins. Let them sit until cool. You can also place them in the refrigerator if you need to speed up the process.

How To Use Lotion Bars

The first time I used a lotion bar I had some trouble. No one explained to me how to use them. I ended up bringing it into the shower with me and used it like a soap bar. It worked pretty well as a moisturizer, but a lot of it would wash off in the shower. Later I figured out that your not supposed to use it in the shower (though I still keep one in my shower because we like to use it the wrong way). Instead you need to rub the bar until it’s warm and then apply it on your skin like lotion. 😉

Find your Beauty Undertone

Ever bought a foundation and thought “Why does this look so terrible on me?!”, it’s probably because you chose the wrong undertone for your skin. Read the tips below and never deal with this problem again!

Here’s what you need to know…

  • Skin tones are often confused for undertones, but they are not the same thing
  • An undertone is the color that lies beneath the skin. It is almost like a shadow below your skin color. While your skin tone can change, the undertone never does.
  • You can have a cool, warm, or neutral undertone.

Here’s how to find your undertone…

  • One way to find your undertone is to think about which colors look best on you – if you tend to look better in cool colors, like blue and white, it’s probably because of your cool undertone. If you gravitate toward oranges or pinks, chances are you have a warm undertone.
  • Study your veins: If they are blue, your undertones are cool. If your veins have a greener tint, it is because your warm undertone makes the color look warmer. Do you have both colors, or veins that appear in between? You may have a neutral undertone.
  • There are other ways of finding your undertone, like trying on jewelry to see what really makes your skin glow – if silver is your go-to, you likely have a cool undertone, and if gold looks best, it could be a result of having a warm undertone